Photo Index – Driving Through Dixie

 

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Please be patient as  thumbnail photos load. Click colored captions to see full-size photos. Either return to this Photo Index by using Browser’s back button or continue on photo tour by clicking indicated “Next Photo” links beneath full-size photos. (Page updated July 22, 2005)

 

Atlanta skyline from 35th floor of Marriott Marquis on Peachtree.

 

Lewis Nolan by plaque on
Lewis Nolan by 'surrender' home
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Appomattox Battlefield near site where General Lee surrendered 9,000 members of the Army of Northern Virginia April 9, 1865.

 

Betty Nolan near entrance to Appomattox Court House Historical Park. Her Mustang Sally is in background.

 

Betty Nolan at entrance to Appomattox Court House Historical Park, visited by fewer than 200,000 persons a year.

 

Lewis Nolan by sign marking General Grant’s pursuit path that trapped General Lee’s forces.

 

Lewis Nolan by tiny cemetery at Appomattox that holds 18 graves of unknown Confederate soldiers plus one Union soldier found later. Others who fell were buried elsewhere.

 

Betty Nolan by restored village of Appomattox Court House, where the end of the Confederacy took shape with General Lee’s surrender.

 

Lewis Nolan in front of visitor center and museum of Appomattox Court House Historical Park on a day marred by occasional rain.

 

Lewis Nolan by McLean house at Appomattox Court House where surrender documents were signed that ending the fighting between the Confederate and Union forces in Virginia, paving the way for the conclusion of the Civil War.

 

Exterior of winery in former community of Stonewall, Virginia. The village name was not connected to
Casey Nolan and Caroline Cardon
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the great Confederate general although it now graces several vintages of wine made here.

 

Casey Nolan and his girlfriend of two years, Caroline Cardon. She painted the artwork in that adorns the living room wall of his new apartment in Arlington.

 

Betty Nolan (left) with son Casey Nolan and his girlfriend, Caroline Cardon. They are standing on the unfinished concrete hallway of his new apartment in the Clarendon neighborhood of Arlington.

 

Casey Nolan and his girlfriend, Caroline Cardon, in the loft area of Casey’s new apartment in Arlington.

 

Lewis Nolan (left) and son Casey Nolan with the Memorial Bridge over the Potomac River to Arlington in the background. They are standing near the Lincoln Memorial.

 

Lewis Nolan (left) and son Casey Nolan by the Korean War Memorial. Expressions on the large, metal statues of infantry soldiers present the exhaustion and struggle of armed conflict.

 

Casey Nolan (left) and his mother, Betty Nolan, near the Lincoln Memorial.

 

Lewis Nolan by the Vietnam War Memorial with the Washington Monument in the background.

 

Light reflection of Lewis Nolan appears on polished surface of section of Vietnam Memorial wall
Lewis, Betty Nolan by reflecting pool
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that includes the name of his best friend and college fraternity brother, Peter Lenhart Siller. Pete was killed by Vietcong machine gun fire in Quang Tri Province in early 1968.

 

Lewis Nolan and Betty Nolan by the reflecting pool on Washington’s Mall, with the Lincoln Memorial in the background.

 

Fountains shoot water into the air at the World War II Memorial with the Lincoln Memorial in the background. The new memorial opened in 2004 – more than a half a century after the bloodiest war in history ended.

 

World War II Memorial includes 50 wreathed columns representing all the states.

 

Lewis Nolan by Pearl Harbor section of World War II Memorial on Washington’s mall.

 

Lewis Nolan by D-Day section of World War II Memorial on Washington’s mall.

 

Lewis Nolan (left) and son Casey Nolan by the World War II Memorial with the Washington Monument in the background.

 

 

Lewis Nolan (left) and son Casey Nolan by bronze statue of seated President Franklin Delano Roosevelt in FDR Memorial. The huge, architecturally exciting series of waterfalls, rock sculptures, deeply engraved carvings and metal statues that make up the memorial are on the Mall but off the main pedestrian area, resulting in little tourism visitation.

 

Lewis Nolan by statues that illustrate one of FDR’s powerful messages.

 

Betty Nolan by one of several waterfalls in FDR Memorial.

 

Casey Nolan by a rock and water sculpture.

 

Lewis Nolan by carving of one of FDR’s often quoted remarks.

 

Lewis Nolan and Betty Nolan by FDR’s principled quotation that resonates loudly in the 21st Century.


Casey Nolan by FDR waterfall
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Betty Nolan by metal statue of FDR’s pet dog, a Scottish terrier.

 

Betty Nolan (left) and Lewis Nolan by a larger-than-life sculpture of FDR.

 

Casey Nolan by a waterfall at FDR Memorial.

 

Casey Nolan by a part of the Potomac River with Thomas Jefferson Memorial in background.

 

Casey Lewis Earle Nolan (left) and his father, Lewis Earle Nolan Jr. by grave of Lewis Earle Nolan M.D. at Arlington National Cemetery. Dr. Nolan died in 1970 and was buried at Arlington per his request. He was a distinguished pathologist who retired from the U.S. Air Force Reserve after 30 years of service in the U.S. Army and USAF Medical Corps.

 

Tombstone of Lewis Earle Nolan, M.D. is located near The Netherlands Carillon.

 

Casey Nolan jokes around by Frederic Church’s hallmark painting, “Niagara,” in Washington’s Corcoran Gallery.

 

Betty Nolan (left) and Lewis Nolan by ornamental ironwork fence that surrounds the White House. The current tenant, a Republican, did not invite the two Democrats in for tea.

 

Betty Nolan (left) and Casey Nolan by flowerbed outside Executive Office Building, where the Vice President has his ceremonial office and many White House staffers work.

 

Lewis Nolan by now-dilapidated cottage at Triangle, Virginia, where he and Betty lived as newlyweds while he was stationed at the nearby Quantico Marine Corps Base. Their landlord, a retired carpenter, had built the two-story duplex and kept it in very good condition while the Nolans lived there in 1968-69.

 

A basket maker enjoys watermelon while weaving her work in Charleston’s open-air market.

 

Lewis Nolan by ferryboat that goes to Fort Sumter in Charleston Harbor.

 

Ferryboat on one-hour ride to Fort Sumter.

 

Betty Nolan by entrance
BIG SHOT: Lewis Nolan by cannon
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to remains of Fort Sumter, where civil war started.

 

Union artillery pounded three-story fort into rubble and ultimately surrender after two years of bombardment. White masonry was installed later.

 

Betty Nolan on rebuilt wall of Fort Sumter. Below is a Confederate Columbiad cannon, a smoothbore artillery piece that could hurl a 300-pound projectile three miles.

 

BIG SHOT: Lewis Nolan by Columbiad cannon. The Union Army’s Parrot Guns were rifled and could blast a 100-pound projectile with accurate fuse devices 4.5 miles, forever ending the effectiveness of masonry forts.

 

Confederate cannons within Fort Sumter.

 

Betty Nolan by gun emplacement bunkers within fort.

 

Lewis Nolan by Union Army Parrot guns that were placed within fort long after it surrendered.

 

Union flag that flew over fort during opening bombardment of Civil War was lowered, preserved and raised again four years later. The shell-damaged flag is on display in the Fort Sumter Museum.

 

Entrance to the 1895 Inn on Oglethorpe Street in the Historic District of Savannah.

 

Bedroom of the Sovereign Room of the 1895 Inn. Top mattress is 12 inches thick.

 

Dining room where gourmet breakfasts are served at the 1895 Inn.


Betty Nolan by Mercer House
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Dining table is set with one of four sets of bone china and fine crystal for multi-course breakfasts.

 

Betty Nolan on broad walkway in Savannah’s Forsyth Park that leads to an often photographed fountain more than 100 years old.

 

Betty Nolan by exquisite, white marble fountain in Savannah’s Forsyth Park that first went into operation in 1858 and has since been renovated.

 

Lewis Nolan relaxes on a bench in one of 18 squares in Savannah’s historic district. The city was laid out around the squares, which are about 75 yards across.

 

Betty Nolan relaxes in a square across from the Mercer House, made famous by the movie “Midnight in the Garden of Good and Evil.”

 

Many of Savannah’s Historic District streets are lined with wide medians that contain dozens of Spanish Moss-draped, Live Oak trees and hundreds of azalea bushes.

 

This picture is real. Flowers on a huge crepe myrtle have pushed their way through the Spanish moss to suggest an ancient Southern Belle decked out in too much makeup.

 

Now the rectory of an adjacent Episcopal Church in Savannah’s Historic District, this magnificent house served as General Sherman’s headquarters for three weeks during his “March Across Georgia” campaign that broke the back of the Confederacy with the torching of Atlanta and much of the state in 1865.

 

Lewis Nolan on Savannah’s River Walk with beautiful bridge in background.

 

Betty Nolan on Savannah’s River Walk with shops catering to tourists in background.

 

Lewis Nolan by fountain and model of the side-wheeler Savannah, which was 100 feet long and the first steam ship to cross the Atlantic.

 

 

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